Neuroticism modulates mood responses to pharmacological sex hormone manipulation in healthy women.

Icon for Elsevier Science Related Articles

Neuroticism modulates mood responses to pharmacological sex hormone manipulation in healthy women.

Psychoneuroendocrinology. 2018 Oct 26;99:251-256

Authors: Stenbæk DS, Budtz-Jørgensen E, Pinborg A, Jensen PS, Frokjaer VG

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Women show increased risk of depressive symptoms during hormonal transition phases. The risk mechanisms may include changes in mood in response to fluctuating ovarian hormones moderated by predisposing risk factors for mood disorders, such as personality trait Neuroticism.
METHODS: A pooled sample of 92 mentally healthy women (28.3 ± 7.1, mean age ± SD) from two independent cohorts run in our lab, using gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist (GnRHa) experimentally (n = 28) compared to placebo (n = 27) and as part in vitro fertilization (n = 37), were extracted from the Center for Integrated Molecular Brain Imaging database. All women filled in questionnaires of trait Neuroticism from the NEO personality Inventory-Revised (NEO PI-R) at baseline and self-reported levels of mood disturbances with the Profile of Mood States (POMS) daily during 14 days of GnRHa intervention or placebo. Effects of intervention by trait Neuroticism on serial daily reports of mood disturbances were examined using mixed model analyses.
RESULTS: Personality trait Neuroticism significantly modulated daily mood responses to GnRHa, but not placebo. Women with high and low scores on trait Neuroticism at baseline experienced more pronounced changes in mood when exposed to GnRHa, whereas women with medium trait Neuroticism scores remained relatively stable.
CONCLUSIONS: The susceptibility to hormone-triggered mood changes appears to depend upon women’s general tendency to experience distress and destabilization of mood, as captured by personality trait Neuroticism. This could aid clinicians evaluate hormone-related vulnerability for mood disorders in women and may guide targeted prevention in reproductive care.

PMID: 30390443 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

Source: My publications feed from NCBI

Evidence for oestrogen sensitivity in perinatal depression: pharmacological sex hormone manipulation study.

Related Articles

Evidence for oestrogen sensitivity in perinatal depression: pharmacological sex hormone manipulation study.

Br J Psychiatry. 2018 Nov 20;:1-9

Authors: Mehta D, Rex-Haffner M, Søndergaard HB, Pinborg A, Binder EB, Frokjaer VG

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Enhanced sensitivity to oestrogen signalling may drive increased risk for depressive symptoms when exposed to peripartum sex-steroid hormone fluctuations.AimTesting if 116 pre-identified sex steroid-responsive transcripts that predicted perinatal depression (PND) translates to a pharmacological model of hormone-induced mood changes.
METHOD: We generated longitudinal, genome-wide gene-expression and DNA-methylation data from 60 women exposed to a gonadotrophin-releasing hormone agonist (GnRHa) or placebo. We used linear mixed-effect models to assess differences between baseline and follow-up for gene expression and DNA methylation in the biphasic ovarian response to GnRHa.
RESULTS: Of the 116 PND-predictive transcripts, a significant (19%) overlap was observed with those differentially expressed post-GnRHa at both early and later follow-up, indicating sustained effects. Similarly, 49% of tested genes were differentially methylated post-GnRHa at the late follow-up. Within the GnRHa group, a large proportion of PND genes were significantly associated (gene expression; DNA methylation) with changes in depressive symptoms (28%; 66%), oestradiol levels (49%; 66%) and neocortex serotonin transporter binding (8%; 45%) between baseline and follow-up.
CONCLUSIONS: Our data bridge clinical PND biomarkers with a pharmacological model of sex hormone-induced mood changes and directly relate oestrogen-induced biological changes with depressive symptoms and associated serotonin-signalling changes. Our data highlight that individual variations in molecular sensitivity to oestrogen associate with susceptibility to hormone-induced mood changes and hold promise for candidate biomarkers.Declaration of interestV.G.F. received honorarium for being a speaker for H. Lundbeck A/S. E.B.B. receives research funding from Böhringer Ingelheim to investigate FKBP5 as a potential drug target for depression.

PMID: 30457060 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

Source: My publications feed from NCBI